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Uncharted Territory

May 10, 2016

One of the biggest problems I struggle with during our investigations is coming up with new meaningful experiments that give us useable data. The hobby of ghost hunting has become so popular that everyone with and EMF detector they bought on Amazon can go out, get a reading and claim that they have found ghosts. Not all EMF spikes are paranormal, there’s no proof that any of them are really. Those detectors weren’t built with the idea of detecting the paranormal, they were made to detect Electric Frequencies associated with other needs, it just happens that someone somewhere was able to mainstream the idea that ghosts give these off. The data is valid, and whoever thought of it first was doing some good thinking outside of the box; but I feel like since then there have not been any further developments on the science behind it. I feel like someone needs to take it a step further.

 

The problem with designing a new experiment is twofold. First off you have to have some kind of hypothesis, a question you want answered. It has to be more specific than, are there ghosts. You have to assume there are or aren’t and that we know some things about what you are trying to measure. The second problem is science is allot of trial and error. There are so many factors that lean toward sthe error part of it that any data you collect cannot be validated until you have proven those results time and again with different equipment and tests. What if you build a new experiment and the experiment is giving false data? How would you know if it’s the first time the experiment has been performed or that equipment used? Repetition of results is the only way, and with paranormal investigation that’s much easier said than done.

 

So far as an investigator I have treaded the same waters as those before me. EMF, EVP, Thermal, Full Spectrum, all of the basics. I knew it was important to at least go through all of these things and understand them fully before moving forward into new ground. You can’t move forward without first building on the past. One by one I have made efforts to improve the experiments already in practice. With our thermal rig I have added a standard IR camera side by side that records the same image. This way there is a comparison to look at when identifying thermal anomalies. Nobody else I know in the industry has done this yet, which is really surprising to me. To my knowledge we are the only group I know of that experiments with monowavelength photography. By flooding the area with low wavelength red light, we widen the bandwidth of the visible spectrum a few degrees when taking pictures. This is actually a similar process to the way bacteria is photographed for the same reasons. This has turned up some interesting results and we eventually hope to find a consistent pattern. One of the bigger theories I have about paranormal activity is that as much as 70% of the cases could be caused by the effects of infrasound. Currently there are no experiments on the market that I have seen anyone else working with. Currently we are developing hardware/software that will flood an area with infrasound to see what the effects are. My theory is that paranormal activity will increase. The question is, is that paranormal activity imagined or real? If we can perceive things happening during that time but not record and document activity, it could make strong case for imagined. We have also started measuring infrasound in the locations we visit and the results have been consistent. In areas with high activity, Infrasound levels are consistently high. While it doesn’t give us a conclusive answer we could potentially hypothesize that high infrasound polluted areas are more likely to have rumors of paranormal activity.

 

As a group we constantly strive to try new things, think of new ways to test, and drive the science forward. Being innovative is the only way to truly be a scientist. Just repeating the same experiments over and over proves nothing and adds no value to the data. What I would like to see is new methods becoming more common with solid science behind them within the next five to ten years. With any luck I would like our group to be a part of that trend.One of the biggest problems I struggle with during our investigations is coming up with new meaningful experiments that give us useable data. The hobby of ghost hunting has become so popular that everyone with and EMF detector they bought on Amazon can go out, get a reading and claim that they have found ghosts. Not all EMF spikes are paranormal, there’s no proof that any of them are really. Those detectors weren’t built with the idea of detecting the paranormal, they were made to detect Electric Frequencies associated with other needs, it just happens that someone somewhere was able to mainstream the idea that ghosts give these off. The data is valid, and whoever thought of it first was doing some good thinking outside of the box; but I feel like since then there have not been any further developments on the science behind it. I feel like someone needs to take it a step further. The problem with designing a new experiment is twofold. First off you have to have some kind of hypothesis, a question you want answered. It has to be more specific than, are there ghosts. You have to assume there are or aren’t and that we know some things about what you are trying to measure. The second problem is science is allot of trial and error. There are so many factors that lean toward the error part of it that any data you collect cannot be validated until you have proven those results time and again with different equipment and tests. What if you build a new experiment and the experiment is giving false data? How would you know if it’s the first time the experiment has been performed or that equipment used? Repetition of results is the only way, and with paranormal investigation that’s much easier said than done. So far as an investigator I have tread the same waters as those before me. EMF, EVP, Thermal, Full Spectrum, all of the basics. I knew it was important to at least go through all of these things and understand them fully before moving forward into new ground. You can’t move forward without first building on the past.

 

One by one I have made efforts to improve the experiments already in practice. With our thermal rig I have added a standard IR camera side by side that records the same image. This way there is a comparison to look at when identifying thermal anomalies. Nobody else I know in the industry has done this yet, which is really surprising to me. To my knowledge we are the only group I know of that experiments with monowavelength photography. By flooding the area with low wavelength red light, we widen the bandwidth of the visible spectrum a few degrees when taking pictures. This is actually a similar process to the way bacteria is photographed for the same reasons. This has turned up some interesting results and we eventually hope to find a consistent pattern.

 

One of the bigger theories I have about paranormal activity is that as much as 70% of the cases could be caused by the effects of infrasound. Currently there are no experiments on the market that I have seen anyone else working with. Currently we are developing hardware/software that will flood an area with infrasound to see what the effects are. My theory is that paranormal activity will increase. The question is, is that paranormal activity imagined or real? If we can perceive things happening during that time but not record and document activity, it could make strong case for imagined. We have also started measuring infrasound in the locations we visit and the results have been consistent. In areas with high activity, Infrasound levels are consistently high. While it doesn’t give us a conclusive answer we could potentially hypothesize that high infrasound polluted areas are more likely to have rumors of paranormal activity. As a group we constantly strive to try new things, think of new ways to test, and drive the science forward. Being innovative is the only way to truly be a scientist. Just repeating the same experiments over and over proves nothing and adds no value to the data.

 

What I would like to see is new methods becoming more common with solid science behind them within the next five to ten years. With any luck I would like our group to be a part of that trend.

 

 

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